Tag Archives: wolverine

70 Aspects of Batman: 34

JOHN ROMITA JR.

From Wikipedia:

John Salvatore Romita, Jr. (born August 17, 1956) is an American comic book artist best known for his extensive work for Marvel Comics from the 1970s to the 2000s.

Romita was born in New York City, the son of John Romita, Sr., co-creator of several notable Spider-Man stories in the 1960s and 1970s.

He began his career at Marvel UK, doing sketches for covers of reprints. His American debut was with a six page story entitled “Chaos at the Coffee Bean!” in The Amazing Spider-Man Annual #11 (1977).

Romita’s early popularity began with his run on Iron Man with writer David Michelinie and artist Bob Layton which began in 1978. In the early 1980s, he had his first regular run on the Amazing Spider-Man series and also was the artist for the launch of the Dazzler series. Working with writer Roger Stern on Amazing Spider-Man, he co created the character Hobgoblin. From 1983 to 1986 he had a run on the popular Uncanny X-Men with Dan Green and author Chris Claremont which was well-received. He would return for a second well-received run on Uncanny X-Men in 1993.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Romita enjoyed an extended stint on Daredevil with writer Ann Nocenti and Eisner Award-winning inker Al Williamson, noted for its creation of long-running Daredevil nemesis Typhoid Mary. His work on Daredevil was well-received, with Romita Jr. further refining his style.

Romita later collaborated with Frank Miller on a Daredevil origin story entitled Daredevil: The Man Without Fear, a revisiting of the character’s origin. He worked on a host of Marvel titles during the 1990s, including The Punisher War Zone, the Hulk, the Cable mini-series, The Mighty Thor, a return to Iron Man for the second Armor Wars written by John Byrne, and the Punisher/Batman cross-over. Klaus Janson was a frequent inker.

In the 2000s, Romita had a well-received return to The Amazing Spider-Man with writer J. Michael Straczynski. He drew Marvel’s Wolverine with author Mark Millar as part of the character’s thirtieth-anniversary celebration. In 2004, Romita’s creator-owned project The Gray Area was published by Image Comics. Romita’s art has since appeared in Black Panther, The Sentry and Ultimate Vision, a backup story featured in the Ultimate line, written by author Mark Millar.

In 2006, Romita collaborated with writer Neil Gaiman on the reinterpretation of Jack Kirby‘s The Eternals in the form of a seven-issue limited series. Romita worked with Greg Pak on the five issue main comic of Marvel’s 2007 crossover event, World War Hulk.

In 2008, Romita again returned to Amazing Spider-Man. He is also collaborating once more with Mark Millar, for a creator-owned series, Kick-Ass, published by Marvel’s Icon imprint. The Filming of the Movie: Kick-Ass, began in September 2008. Romita, one of the producers, made his directorial debut by directing an animated flashback sequence in the film.

Romita is the regular artist for Avengers, which relaunched the franchise in May 2010.

John Romita Jr. may be the best pure superhero artist working in comics today. Over the course of his over 30 year career he has worked almost exclusively for Marvel Comics, so any images of characters from other companies by him. Fortunately, in the mid-90s before Marvel and DC became parts of huge conglomerates and were still open to crossovers, Romita Jr. drew a Batman/Punisher one-shot. For a reader used to Romita’s work only appearing in Marvel comics, seeing the denizens of Gotham City drawn in his style creates a certain cognitive dissonance…but once the brain adjusts, it’s a great visual experience. To date, apart from a sketch or two, Romita Jr. hasn’t drawn Batman since, which is a shame as his style has become more stripped down and direct as time’s gone on…kind of like this sketch below, done years after the one-shot:

I love this sequence from Batman/Punisher…it’s a well drawn sequence that flows and says a lot about the characters portrayed in it:

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Wednesday Comics: 11/4/09

 

Marvel Strange Tales #3 cover

 

It’s Wednesday, and Wednesday = comics. So here are some comics you can buy today!

 

http://www.examiner.com/examiner/x-27333-Des-Moines-Graphic-Novels-Examiner~y2009m11d4-Wednesday-comics-11409#

 

Strange Tales, Lobo, Criminal…y’know, whatever.

 

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70 Aspects Of Batman: 8

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SIMONE BIANCHI

From Wikipedia:

Simone Bianchi (born July 10, 1971[1] in Lucca, Italy) is an Italian comic book illustrator, painter, graphic designer and art instructor, known to Italian audiences for his work in comics, CD covers, music videos, TV commercials and role-playing games, and to American comic book readers for his work on Detective Comics, Green Lantern and Wolverine. Bianchi’s style is distinguished by his use of ink wash, or watercolor halftones,[1] in rendering his work, a non-traditional technique by mainstream American standards.[2]

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I first saw Bianchi’s art in the Shining Knight miniseries that was part of Grant Morrison‘s Seven Soldiers megaseries. I was certainly impressed by his ability, and was also kind of surprised that DC was working with someone whose style is so European. Traditionally, American mainstream comic readers haven’t been terribly open to European artists, preferring instead Jim Lee clones from Brazil. Both for some reason, Simone’s work caught on over here.

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After completing Shining Knight, Bianchi went over to Marvel, where first he worked with Jeph Loeb on Wolverine. He currently is partnered up with Warren Ellis on Astonishing X-Men. But during this Marvel tenure, he still found time to be the cover artist on both Batman and Detective Comics, which is where this images hail from.

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Hopefully at some point he’ll come to his senses and do some actual Batman interior work, but until then you’ll have to settle for this. Or you could buy X-Men too, I suppose.

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70 Aspects Of Batman: 7

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DARWYN COOKE

Darwyn Cooke began his Batman association not with comics, but with animation. Having worked for years in his native Canada as a graphic designer, Cooke wanted to break into the professional world of his first love, comic books. However, the industry at the time was less than responsive to his Jack Kirby meets Alex Toth style, as enamored by Rob Liefeld clones as it was then. He did however get work on the great Batman: The Animated Series as a storyboard artist.

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He finally broke into comics with a Batman one-shot he both wrote and drew, called Batman: EGO.

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He really broke through with his Elseworlds miniseries DC: The New Frontier, a story that imagines what it might be like if DC continuity matched up to when its characters were introduced. This allowed Cooke many opportunities to draw 50s and early 60s inspired art-deco designs, clothing, etc., which is a bit of a fetish with him.

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He also drew the Jeph Loeb-scripted Batman/Spirit one-shot, which saw the Caped Crusader meet Will Eisner’s beloved masked avenger, and which also acted as a prelude to his own relaunch of the character.

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And his version of Batman got a toy.

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D. COOKE!

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