Tag Archives: oasis

TOP ELEVEN SINGLES OF 2009

Leave it to me to wait until the very last day of the year to upload my top ten of 2009 list to the blog….and for it not to even be a top ten. Here are my eleven favorite singles released over the course of the last 364 days; this list could easily be very different if it had been written last week or next week, but here’s where I stand as of today, December 31st, 2009:

ANIMAL COLLECTIVE – “MY GIRLS”

This one is sure to be on many indie-ish lists this year, but I feel like I have to include it here, because I like it. It starts off  with Phillip Glass-esque arpeggios, includes massive handclaps and one of the best singalong choruses of the year. And it’s even emotionally resonant to boot. I remember hearing this shortly after it came out at a small basement show BP played in Boone, Iowa. It sounded really great then, and for me it confirmed this song as an instant classic.

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DEPECHE MODE – “WRONG”

I’m a huge Depeche fan, so there was almost no chance that I wouldn’t include a single by them on this list. But favoritism aside, I think “Wrong” is easily one of the band’s strongest songs of the last 15 years. It’s a bit of a grower, lacking an immediate hook like past DM hits, but its repetition, rhythm and forward momentum add up to a great, dark groove. With one of the year’s darkest videos, to boot.

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THE FLAMING LIPS – “WATCHING THE PLANETS”

THE FLAMING LIPS – “WATCHING THE PLANETS”

“Watching The Planets” closes the Lips’ newest record in bombastic fashion; after journeying through Embryonic‘s weird experiments and strange interludes, the listener is greeted by this song, arguably the album’s most straighforward song. An insistent, pounding rhythm underpins Wayne’s chant-like vocals, while twinkly keys add a melancholy touch to the proceedings.

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GIRLS – “HELLHOLE RATRACE”

Girls are my favorite new band of the year, and “Hellhole Ratrace” is my favorite song from their debut album Album. A slow build song a la Spiritualized, “Hellhole” grows from its modest beginnings into a “Hey Jude” for the Noughties. The best chorus of the year, in my opinion:    “And I don’t want to cry my whole life through/I wanna do some laughing, too/So come on, come on, come on, come on and laugh with me/And I don’t want to die/Without shaking up a leg or two/Yeah, I wanna do some dancing too/So come on, come on, come on, come on and dance with me”. Simple, resonant and relateable, these lines become a mantra as wave after wave of sound is added, creating a cathartic effect that once experienced, is hard to forget.

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THE HORRORS – “SEA WITHIN A SEA”

When I first heard of The Horrors a few years ago, I grouped them in with all the other garage-rock bands NME was championing at the time. It wasn’t until Manic Street Preachers said the band’s new album Primary Colours was their favorite of the year that I actually listened. And I glad I did. Behind the haircuts and moody stares is actual musical talent and ambition, as evidenced in “Sea Within A Sea”. Starting as a dark motorik groove, “Sea” takes its time establishing a mood, gradually changing from its initial foreboding to a synth-strewn climax. 2009’s most pleasant surprise for me.

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IAN BROWN – “STELLIFY”

What I really like about “Stellify” is its minimalism. Based mainly around the same simple piano riff and a stomping beat, Ian Brown and his collaborators still manage to create and sustain interest in the song throughout its duration. Brown’s love of hip-hop is fully evident here, and the mid-song horn break adds an ebullient touch to an already uplifting song. When the two elements come together, it creates one of the greatest moments in the man’s solo catalog.

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LADY GAGA – “BAD ROMANCE

Yes, Lady Gaga. I love this song and I love this video. I like some of the singles from her first album, but I feel she’s kicked it up several notches on this one. It’s melodramatic, has a great melody and a big chorus. It almost reminds me of Erasure. I don’t care about the crazy costumes or any of that other crap; as long as she releases singles like this, that’s what really matters.

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MAJOR LAZER ft. RICKY BLAZE & NINA SKY – “KEEP IT GOIN’ LOUDER”

I discovered this song through the brilliant, deranged video directed by Tim and Eric’s Eric Wareheim. And though that was my initial reason for listening to it, I’ve come to love “Keep It Goin’ Louder” based on it on merits. It has a lot of elements that have turned me off of other songs: auto-tune, lyrics about clubbin’…but the way these elements are put together on this track work for me totally. I think it’s the sense of euphoria that underlines the entire song…it makes a line like “Girl I wanna party with you” seem almost life-affirming.

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MORRISSEY – “SOMETHING IS SQUEEZING MY SKULL”

Morrissey’s return to prominence after seven years in the wilderness was one of my favorite music-related stories of the 2000s. “Something Is Squeezing My Skull” was the final single of this decade of renewed activity, and it’s a doozy. A thrashy rocker, “Skull” becomes a classic when Moz’s lyrics of mental instability are thrown into the mix. He manages to make it sound exhilarating and hopeless at the same time.

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OASIS – “FALLING DOWN”

Upon its release in March, I had no idea that “Falling Down” was destined to be Oasis’ final single (at least for now). But if it is to be the band’s last release, it’s an appropriate one. Instead of a rousing anthem or a sing-along ballad, “Falling Down” is instead an uncertain, world-weary slice of psychedelia sung by Noel instead of Liam. I like the idea of the Oasis story ending on a note of doubt and ambiguity; and if this is, indeed, the end, it’s a fitting conclusion.

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YEASAYER – “AMBLING ALP”

Yeasayer is doing what I’d like to do musically – mixing experimental tendencies with pop sensibilities. Their debut album was quite good but I’m really excited for 2010’s Odd Blood if “Ambling Alp” is any indication.


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HONORABLE MENTIONS


– Asobi Seksu – “Familiar Light”

– Bad Lieutentant – “Sink Or Swim”

– Echo & The Bunnymen – “Think I Need It Too”

– eels – “Fresh Blood”

– Franz Ferdinand – “No You Girls”

– Julian Casablancas – “11th Dimension”

– Phoenix – “1901”

– The Prodigy – “Warriors Dance”

– Weezer – “(If You’re Wondering If I Want You To) I Want You To”

– Yeah Yeah Yeahs – “Zero”

On to 2010…

G.

Noising Machine Singles Club: 12

U2 - 11 O'Clock Tick Tock (non-album single) [1980]

U2

“11 O’CLOCK TICK TOCK”

b/w “Touch”

Released 5/23/80

(U2)

A lot of people reading this entry probably aren’t big U2 fans. Actually, some of you might actively hate them. But there was a time before all the grand gestures and posturing when U2 was just a band of Dublin high school-age Joy Division obsessives. That’s the time that this single, “11 O’Clock Tick Tock” hails from.

“11 O’ Clock” is certainly the U2 song most indebted to that Mancunian post-punk foursome. The single was produced by Joy Division and Factory Records house producer Martin Hannett, and even the sleeve was made by Factory Records house designer Peter Saville . The band first met Hannett during the recording sessions for Joy Division’s most famous song “Love Will Tear Us Apart”, which, for U2, must have been like if Ryan Meier could have watched Weezer record “Buddy Holly”, or if I could have watched Oasis record “Wonderwall”, etc.

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Hannett was actually tapped not just to helm this non-album single but the entirety of the band’s debut Boy, an arrangement that fell apart upon the suicide of Joy Division singer Ian Curtis (an event that inspired the song “A Day Without Me”, found on the aforementioned album). Curtis’ death happened soon before U2 was due to record their album and the tragedy left Martin Hannett emotionally unable to begin the album at the neccessary time. Thus, producer Steve Lillywhite stepped behind the console and a long and fruitful relationship between he and the band began, one that continues to this day.

As for the song itself, it’s not a Joy Division xerox or anything…it definitely sounds like U2. Bono still sounds unmistakeably like Bono, albeit in his early, fake British accent phase. The Edge‘s guitar part is certainly reminiscent of Bernard Sumner‘s, but it also recalls the ringing tones of Keith Levene of Public Image Ltd. And the schoolboy choir vocal break is a technique that their heroes would be unlikely to utilize themselves. Its post-punk influence and muscular performance have made it one of my favorite U2 songs. Curiously, even though it ranks among the band’s top 20 most-performed songs (largely because it was including in almost all of the band’s sets from 1980-1984) and was included on their popular Under A Blood Red Sky live album, “11 O’Clock” remains relatively obscure. It’s never been included as part of a U2 best-of or singles collections, and until last year’s reissue of Boy (on which it was included as part of the supplements), it had never been widely available on compact disc.

Boatband

While it’s unfortunate that “11 O’Clock Tick Tock” has become obscured by the likes of  “Beautiful Day”, ultimately its quality remains remarkably undiminished. If one is inclined enough to seek it out it provides a vision of U2 before the pomp and stadium circumstance, when the band were still an up-and-coming concern and willing acolytes to a more idiosyncratic sound.

Video:

Live at Red Rocks:

And a live version of b-side “Touch”, San Francisco circa ’81:

G.

CONCERT: MORRISSEY w/ The Courteeners (Aragon Ballroom, Chicago, IL 4/4/09)

Time number 5 for Morrissey and me. Paris, Austin, Omaha, Kansas City and now, having just released his new album Years Of Refusal, Chicago. Mandy and I made the pilgrimage to the historic Aragon Ballroom in downtown Chicago (the place with the tall stage), stopping only for gas, bladder relief and a great meal at The Chicago Diner. After waiting in line for a bit and being frisked, we managed to jockey for a position in the fourth row. There we waited, as the temperature rose with the increasing body heat. Then…lights off! Show!

thecourteeners

The openers were a band from Manchester, England called The Courteeners. I’d heard a bit about them before, but was basically unfamiliar with them until today. They put on a good show….it’s a thankless task to open for pretty much anybody, but when you’re opening for someone with such a fantically devoted audience as That Guy Who Used To Be In The Smiths Who Isn’t Johnny Marr, Andy Rourke or Mike Joyce, I’m sure it can be especially punishing. Having said that, they went over pretty well with the crowd. The Courteeners’ sound isn’t a million miles away from, say, The Libertines (in fact, I’d say it’s more like three houses down), but they do what they do well, and their single “Not Nineteen Forever” was a definite highlight for me. It made me want to hear more from them, so mission accomplished. After these lads exited the stage, videos were projected onto a large sheet that covered up all but the very front of the stage. This was done between sets during the 2007 shows as well, and most of the videos were the same as then (New York Dolls performances, etc.). Since then, he seems to have developed (or exposed) an interest in 60’s Dutch rock band  The Shocking Blue (perhaps best known on these shores for their song “Venus” and “Love Buzz”, which was covered by Nirvana and released as their first single), as three performances of theirs were included here. As the final video ended, the sheet fell to the floor, exposing a backdrop with the gentleman on it, “Refusal” emblazoned across his chest:

sailor

And then Morrissey appeared.

morrissey-naked

(But not, unfortunately, like this.)

The man emerged from the wings dressed to the nines in a dapper tux, with his band uniformly wearing black shirts and slacks with white ties featuring their leader’s face. “Good evening, Chicago“, said Morrissey in a “Da Bears voice as “This Charming Man” sprang to life. It was great to finally hear rthis song live; he had never played it since going solo until this year (I remember when my brother and I went to see Morrissey in Paris in 2004; between songs someone requested “This Charming Man”, to which Steven parroted in what can only be described as a “retard” voice “This Chauming Mahn, This Chauming Mahn). It lacked some of Johnny Marr’s more Johnny Marr-ish parts, but it was still delightful to hear the song that made me love The Smiths in-person.  “Something Is Squeezing My Skull” (a highlight of the new album and its next single) came next and saw Morrissey whipping his mic cord around as he is wont to do; it was quickly followed by Vauxhall & I‘s “Billy Budd” and Refusal‘s “Black Cloud”, before making way for that one song, “How Soon Is Now?”.

As the opening tremelo of “How Soon..?” was sounded, the crowd went predictably wild. There’s a reason that this song has been included in most of Morrissey’s setlists since 2004…for most people, this is his signature song, and the Smiths song most likely to be known to a non-Smiths fan. However, I would fine if he dropped it. Obviously, it’s a great song but I’ve seen it live at least four times. But much like I wish Oasis would give “Wonderwall” a rest at shows, I wouldn’t mind “How Soon” being relegated to the mothballs for a bit. Having said that, it was probably the best live version I’ve seen to date.

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Two tracks from Moz’s “comeback” album You Are The Quarry, “Irish Blood, English Heart” & “How Could Anybody Possibly Know How I Feel?” came next and cleared the way for a spirited rendition of The Smiths’ “Ask” (which featured the lyrical change “If it’s not love/Then it’s military might/Then it’s macho military might that will bring us together”). Refusal‘s first single “I’m Throwing My Arms Around Paris” saw longtime Morrissey collaborator Boz Boorer show off his mean clarinet skills, and acted as a jangly prelude to the mid-tempo glam of “The World Is Full Of Crashing Bores” (strangely, four tracks from 2004’s Quarry were included the set, but none from 2006’s Ringleader Of The Tormentors). A languid bass intro signaled the beginning of “Death Of A Disco Dancer”, one of the highlights of The Smiths’ final album Strangeways Here We Come; its performance saw Morrissey stationary at the microphone, while the band worked up the song’s queasy groove. After finishing his vocal contribution Morrissey left the stage, allowing the musicians to jam out on the song’s outro in a way that Marr, Rourke & Joyce may have done had they ever performed it live. Definitely a concert highlight.

Morrissey reappeared, newly de-tuxed and dived into “The Loop”, a personal favorite and one of his most rockabilly numbers (upright bass and all). “Does anybody want to stare into an open grave?”, he asked as the band kicked into “I Keep Mine Hidden”, the final song to be written and recorded by The Smiths. I was really surprised when I saw this appear on setlists earlier this year, as I never thought it would get a live airing (like “Disco Dancer”, The Smiths didn’t survive long enough after recording it to consider playing it). In this instance I was quite happy to be wrong, as its jaunty arrangement translated well to the live arena.”One Day Goodbye Will Be Farewell” followed, making way for another high point, a perfomance of “Seasick, Yet Still Docked” from 1992’s Your Arsenal. The stage was bathed in blue light as the song’s melancholy progression reverberated throughout the Aragon. Lovely ambient keys added pathos to this song, so often overlooked.

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The rocking continued post-haste thereafter, as “Best Friend On The Payroll” from 1995’s soon-to-be-reissued Southpaw Grammar thundered to life, acting as a bridge between the sorrowful “Seasick” and a wistful “Let Me Kiss You”, which concluded with the obilgatory take-off-shirt-and-throw-it-to-the-crowd bit. A trio of tracks from Years Of Refusal ended the main set (“When Last I Spoke To Carol” sounded great, in particular), and after the cursory stage exit and applause Moz & Co. came back on-stage and launched into “First Of The Gang To Die”, a performance that saw him dispense with most of the words in favor of various gutteral grunts and squawks. You are reminded when seeing him live how much of a weirdo Morrissey actually is. And with that the stage was vacated and the show was closed.

On the way back, I listened to The Ricky Gervais Guide To… and the new Depeche Mode album twice.

Overall, time no. 5 was quite good, but I am incredibly biased. I feel the setlist could use some work; when one has over 200 songs available, both with The Smiths and solo, should such greats as “Reel Around The Fountain”, “Suedehead” or “Glamorous Glue” be left on the sidelines while the likes of four songs from You Are The Quarry and “How Soon Is Now?” are allowed to run rampant? No, obviously, but that’s what comes with being a Morrissey fan. I really get the impression that he plays what he wants to play, and isn’t trying to cater to the audience (“How Soon?” excluded). I mean, he waited 21 years to play “This Charming Man”, one of his most beloved songs. The performance was a great, I just wish the set was a bit more varied. But that’s ok…as long as he’s playing live, I’ll still see him. It’s always a treat. Where will time no. 6 be? Will there be a time no. 6? Who knows these things? Lord knows I don’t. But until next time…keep watching the skies!

SETLIST

1.) THIS CHARMING MAN

2.) SOMETHING IS SQUEEZING MY SKULL

3.) BILLY BUDD

4.) BLACK CLOUD

5.) HOW SOON IS NOW?

6.) IRISH BLOOD, ENGLISH HEART

7.) HOW COULD ANYBODY POSSIBLY KNOW HOW I FEEL?

8.) ASK

9.) I’M THROWING MY ARMS AROUND PARIS

10.) THE WORLD IS FULL OF CRASHING BORES

11.) DEATH OF A DISCO DANCER

12.) THE LOOP

13.) I KEEP MINE HIDDEN

14.) ONE DAY GOODBYE WILL BE FAREWELL

15.) SEASICK, YET STILL DOCKED

16.) BEST FRIEND ON THE PAYROLL

17.) LET ME KISS YOU

18.) SORRY DOESN’T HELP

19.) WHEN LAST I SPOKE TO CAROL

20.) I’M OK BY MYSELF

ENCORE

21.) FIRST OF THE GANG TO DIE

VIDS:

STAGE ENTRY & THIS CHARMING MAN (SNIPPET)


BLACK CLOUD & HOW SOON IS NOW?


SEASICK, YET STILL DOCKED

WHEN LAST I SPOKE TO CAROL

DEATH OF A DISCO DANCER (CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL, 3/09)


I KEEP MINE HIDDEN (BBC CONCERT, 2009)

THIS CHARMING MAN (BBC CONCERT, 2009)

G.



Singles Club: 8

bethere

UNKLE featuring IAN BROWN

“BE THERE”

b/w “THE KNOCK-ON EFFECT”

Released 2/1/99

(Davis/Brown)

Kind of an interesting case, this one.  Throughout its 15 year existence, UNKLE has largely been comprised of Mo’ Wax Records founder James Lavelle and whoever else is around at the time. UNKLE’s first formation revolved around Lavelle and future DFA co-head Tim Goldsworthy; its second major incarnation featured Lavelle and Josh Davis a.k.a. DJ Shadow.

The group’s debut album Psyence Fiction was released in 1998 and featured collaborations with artists like Thom Yorke, Richard Ashcroft, Badly Drawn Boy and Mike D., among others. One vocalist that did not appear on the album is former Stone Roses frontman Ian Brown, yet the second single released to promote Fiction features his rough Northern tones. Originally presented as an instrumental entitled “Unreal”, with Brown’s words and vocals on top the song became “Be There”.

On a personal note, this particular single changed my musical life, and therefore my life in general. I imported this single (like so many others) through sirendisc.com, but purely for its b-side, a remix of Psyence Fiction‘s “The Knock (Drums Of Death Pt. 2)” done by Noel Gallagher of Oasis. I had picked up Fiction when it came out the year before and really liked it (especially “Lonely Soul”), but I was certainly not an UNKLE completist. I was, however, an Oasis completist, and in these distant days before filesharing and hi-speed, sirendisc was usually my only way to get the UK-only releases that Oasis and so many of my other favorite bands put out.

The aforementioned remix, entitled “The Knock-On Effect”, was a pretty good effort and incorporated elements of the Led Zeppelin sound Noel was obsessed with at the time (it’s also probably the only time Noel Gallagher, DJ Shadow, Jason Newstead and Mike D. will ever appear together). But on my way to this b-side, I listened to “Be There”. It started like “Unreal” did on the album: dreamy keys underlined by ominous strings until the beat kicked in. So far, so same until about 40 seconds in when that voice comes in.

Now, Ian Brown doesn’t have a technically great voice. He’s a personality singer. And for whatever reason, as he sang the lyric of “Be There”, I was captivated. I was aware of The Stone Roses, knowing them as an influence on Oasis, and I was vaguely familiar with their single “Love Spreads”, which was a moderate U.S. hit. But for whatever reason, as of early 1999, I had yet to investigate them. It was a real moment of discovery for me. The next month I was at the CD Warehouse on Merle Hay Road in Des Moines, and bought The Stone Roses’ debut (as well as Modern Life Is Rubbish by Blur). It really changed my life, and influenced the way I sing, the way I write lyrics and the way I look at the world. Hyperbolic maybe, but true for me. And it may not have happened without “Be There”, a great, great single in its own right.

Audio:

And a severely truncated live version on Top Of The Pops circa ’99:

G.

CHRISTMAS CAROLZ

Well, it’s just about a week until Christmas. Excited yet? No? Oops. I put together this collection of Christmas songs/videos that hopefully will get you into the spirit of things. Merry Christmas and check it:

Asobi Seksu – “Merry Christmas (I Don’t Wan’t To Fight Tonight)” (Ramones Cover)

Oasis – “Merry X-Mas Everybody” (Slade Cover)

The Beatles – “Christmas Time Is Here Again”

Weezer – “O Holy Night”

Joel & The Bots – “Patrick Swayze Christmas”

Mike & The Bots – “Merry Christmas…If That’s Ok”

Manic Street Preachers – “The Ghost of Christmas”

Wham! – “Last Christmas”

Belle & Sebastian – “O Come, O Come Emmaneul”

The Flaming Lips – “Christmas At The Zoo”

Morning Musume – “Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer”

miloprometheus

related post:

CONCERT: OASIS & RYAN ADAMS (Target Center, Minneapolis, MN 12/10/08)

So this past Wednesday I saw Oasis with special guests Ryan Adams & Cardinals in Minneapolis at the Target Center. Oasis has been one of my very favorite bands for the last 12 years, so I’m always excited to see them. Ryan Adams, I got into through my cousin while we lived together in college. And Target has been a Minnesota institution for awhile now. So herez what went down:

First off, there was a short acoustic set by this guy, Matt Costa. Wasn’t really into it.In my opinion, he didn’t do anything to distinguish himself from the 64,000,000 acoustic singer-songwriter guys out there. But he was opening for Oasis and Ryan Adams, so he at least has a good agent.

Ryan Adams and The Cardinals were up next. In spite of having seen them just a little over two months ago in Ames, I was still looking forward to this set. It’s always nice when there’s an opener that you’re not only looking forward to seeing, but would actually pay to see on their own. If I had to pick I’d say I preferred their Ames set, mainly because, it being their own headlining show, RA & The Cs were more able to cherry pick songs from throughout their entire catalogue. Tonight’s setlist was mostly drawn from the new album Cardinology and last year’s Easy Tiger (though “When The Stars Go Blue” from 2001’s Gold and “Let It Ride” from 2005’s Cold Roses were also included). Having said that, it was still a great set. I really enjoy how the band build upon the templates of the songs on the albums and make them rockier and jammier live. A simple, three-minute acoustic number on record like “Off Broadway” becomes a six and a half minute extended jam. I prefer these live versions and, though I like the final Cardinology album, I wish it sounded more like this. Really good set, and I’m glad they were allowed an hour, which to me seems very generous for an opener.

SETLIST

Entrance: Sandford And Son Theme

1.) Cobwebs

2.) Crossed-Out Name

3.) Everybody Knows

4.) When The Stars Go Blue

5.) Fix It

6.) Let It Ride

7.) Off Broadway

8.) Go Easy

9.) Sink Ships

10.) Born Into A Light

11.) I Taught Myself How To Grow Old

12.) Two

13.) Natural Ghost

14.) Magick

I couldn’t find any videos of RA & The Cs from this performace online, so here are a few from other places:

“Fix It” on Letterman (10/08)

“Off Broadway” live, St. Louis (10/08)

“Magick” live, (9/08)

“Cobwebs” on Letterman Online (10/08)

Next of course was Oasis. This was my fourth time seeing these blokes (cause they’re British, geddit?): time number one was also in Minneapolis but was way back in 2000, when they were touring with Travis in support of  Standing On The Shoulder of Giants; the next time was in 2001 in St. Paul with The Black Crowes and time three was in Chicago in 2005 for the Don’t Believe The Truth tour. This time around they’re on the road to promote their new album Dig Out Your Soul. Six songs were played from Soul, including lead single “The Shock Of The Lightning“, Liam’s lovely Lennon tribute “I’m Outta Time” and a groovy, psych “To Be Where There’s Life” written by guitarist Gem Archer. A smattering of lesser-known songs (at least to most American fans) were included in the set, including fan-favorite b-side “The Masterplan” and “Songbird” from 2002’s Heathen Chemistry. And of course there were many selections from their first two (and best) albums, Definitely Maybe and (What’s The Story) Morning Glory? . The biggest reactions were saved for the three big singles from the latter: huge cheers for “Wonderwall“, an arena-wide singalong for a lovely semi-acoustic version of “Don’t Look Back In Anger” and both for “Champagne Supernova“. Personally, as much as I love these songs, I’d be fine if they were dropped from the set; they’ve been played on every tour since 1995, and there are dozens of other songs that I’d rather hear that haven’t been played in years or at all (very early on his tour, “My Big Mouth” from 1997’s overly-maligned Be Here Now was played, but was quickly dropped. Myself and other longtime fans were annoyed). Of course, this will probably never happen. Most of the people who came out tonight probably did so in large part to hear these songs, so it’s understandable that the band would play those over three b-sides or something. Overall though, I think Oasis struck a good balance of crowd-pleasers, new songs and a few other bits and bobs from the catalogue. I’d be the first to admit that I am far from impartial when it comes to this band, so your mileage may vary as to how much you might enjoy this show. For me personally, it was great. There are very few bands who I will bother to see in an arena setting, and Oasis is one of them. They were the first band that made me want to be in a band, and I’m glad that the kind of passion for music they inspire in me remains undiminished.

SETLIST

Entrance: Fuckin’ In The Bushes

1.) Rock N’ Roll Star

2.) Lyla

3.) The Shock Of The Lightning

4.) Cigarettes And Alcohol

5.) The Meaning Of Soul

6.) To Be Where There’s Life

7.) Waiting For The Rapture

8.) The Masterplan

9.) Songbird

10.) Slide Away

11.) Morning Glory

12.) Ain’t Got Nothin’

13.) The Importance Of Being Idle

14.) I’m Outta Time

15.) Wonderwall

16.) Supersonic

ENCORE

17.) Don’t Look Back In Anger

18.) Falling Down

19.) Champagne Supernova

20.) I Am The Walrus

Here are a lot of videos from the show, of varying quality:

“Morning Glory”

“Champagne Supernova”

“Cigarettes & Alcohol”

“Don’t Look Back In Anger”

“Waiting For The Rapture”

“Lyla”

“Wonderwall”

“Songbird”

“Supersonic”

“The Importance Of Being Idle”

“I Am The Walrus”

related posts: