Tag Archives: New York Times

Comics In The Classroom: Grand View University

By Greg Goode

Watchmen, the seminal graphic novel by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, appears on Time magazine’s 100 Greatest Novels of the 20th Century list.  In 2009, The New York Times began publishing a graphic novel bestseller list.  The same year, Heath Ledger wins an Oscar for his portrayal of The Joker, Batman’s arch-enemy, in Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight.

The comic book, long considered a disposable object exclusively for children, is finally getting some respect. Further validation for the art form can be found on college campuses, where graphic novels are becoming an increasingly common part of the curriculum, including at Grand View University in Des Moines, Iowa.

Matt Plowman, Grand View’s associate professor of history, first experienced comics in the classroom at another institution as part of a critical thinking class on the Holocaust. Plowman said one of the most powerful texts the class read was Maus by Art Spigelman, a graphic novel about Spigelman’s father’s experience in a Nazi concentration camp.

“I’ve seen [graphic novels] used very effectively, and communicate things that just weren’t alive on the page of a history book,” Plowman said. “Literally, it’s graphing reality for them, picturing reality and playing with it.”

Later this semester in his European Cultural & Intellectual History class, Plowman will be using V For Vendetta by Moore and David Lloyd, a graphic novel about an anarchist’s war against authority in a near-future totalitarian England.

“With European intellectual history, you kind of have to show where society’s moving,” Plowman said. “So I was looking for something that was late 20th century, and particularly with where a lot of European thinkers were going, there’s a lot of dystopia. And the graphic novels tend to be on the edge of that.”

Plowman said he picked V For Vendetta partly because of the students familiarity with the story from its 2006 film adaptation.

“I wanted them to be able to see the original intent of Alan Moore and what he’s really trying to say about society,” Plowman said. “Sometimes it’s easier for some students, rather than trying to find a movie that has a traditional novel, where they have to do more literary criticism. Especially for the visual learners.”

Kevin Gannon, professor of history at Grand View, said he’s always been intrigued by the use of graphic novels in class. Two years ago, Gannon took part in a summer reading program for the Grand View freshman class that used Gene Luen Yung’s graphic novel American Born Chinese.

“I had never taught with that before and in my discipline, it’s not very common. We use pretty standard vanilla textbooks. I was intrigued with the idea,” Gannon said. “I was a bit intimidated by the idea, too, because I had no idea how to teach it. What I learned is that it’s just like any other text.”

This semester, Gannon is assigning A People’s History of American Empire, a graphic novel that adapts writings by radical historian Howard Zinn. Gannon said students have responded to the text enthusiastically.

“For me personally, a graphic novel fits right in with the way I structure my courses and what I want students to be able to do with the texts that we read,” Gannon said.

Other Grand View instructors utilizing comics include Ken Jones, who assigned the zombie apocalypse story The Walking Dead in his Introduction to Ethics class this semester and Jim Whyte, who has given students the task of creating their own comics in his Principles of Management class.

Gannon said he sees the use of graphic novels in his class as a way of expanding his students’ ideas of what materials can be used in the classroom environment.

“I ask my students to be open-minded and look at different things as text, not just the standard printed page,” Gannon said. “If I’m going to ask my students to look at a text in that way, I should be willing to do the same myself.  And that’s where graphic novels help stretch me as a teacher.”

Bacon Explosion, etc.

bacon650_331

The New York Times posted an article about the recipe for Bacon Explosion, which has 5,000 calories and 500 grams of fat.  See above.

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Since I’ve mentioned one ridiculous food, I might as well mention Doner Kebabs, which have disgusting amounts of fat, saturated fat and salt.  Also, according to the BBC article, 33% of doner kebabs are mismarked for the type of meat they contain.

– ninjagarden

3 things: women for mccain, new york times electoral map, and palin news

1. i’m also a woman for mccain.

2. here’s another bonus today: make sure to check out the new york times electoral map, which shows obama winning in a multitude of ways ! make your own map ! just make sure mccain loses.

and 3. there’s been news of palin’s $150,000 shopping spree, but my most favorite thing today is that her makeup artist was paid upwards of $20,000 for the first two weeks of october. her name is amy strozzi, and you can look at her imdb here.

nataliebeth

Olympics Lolzs

Spain’s Olympic basketball teams posing for photos pull back skin of eyelids

Spanish star Calderon defends poses as ‘respect’ for Chinese

The controversial image

The controversial image ( El Mundo photo / August 13, 2008 )

BEIJING — The Spanish men’s and women’s basketball teams posed for pre-Olympics photos in which their members are pulling back the skin of their eyelids in a racially offensive manner, causing controversy just as Madrid battles Chicago for the 2016 Summer Olympics.

The photo appeared as an advertisement for a courier company that sponsors the Spanish Basketball Federation, which didn’t immediately respond to a phone call because its offices were closed overnight.

A spokeswoman for the Spanish Olympic Committee based here said her organization had nothing to do with the photo, which appeared in the Spanish daily sports newspaper Marca before the Spanish national team traveled to China.

Spain, the defending world champion in men’s basketball, held a closed practice here Wednesday. Meanwhile, several Chinese-rights organizations decried the photos.

“It is unfortunate that this type of imagery would rear its head during something that is supposed to be a time of world unity,” said George Wu, deputy director for the Organization of Chinese Americans in Washington, D.C.

Spain has been involved in previous racial incidents involving sports. FIFA, soccer’s ruling organization, fined the Spanish Football Federation $90,000 in 2004 after Spanish fans shouted racist chants at black English players.

Spanish fans also taunted English driver Lewis Hamilton earlier this year, prompting the governing body for Formula One to initiate an anti-racism campaign.

The New York Times reported the Spanish national teams are sponsored by Li-Ning, the footwear company owned by Chinese Olympic hero and torch lighter Li Ning. In his blog at elmundo.es, national team stalwart Jose Calderon wrote of that association and his team’s “great respect for the East and its people.”

Calderon defended the gesture.

“One of our sponsors asked us to make, as a ‘wink’ to our participation in Beijing, an expression of Eastern eyes,” he wrote. “We felt it was something appropriate and that it would always be interpreted as an affectionate gesture. … Whoever wants to interpret something different, totally confused.”

 

ninjagarden