Tag Archives: David Bowie

40 YEARS AGO: 1971

MUSIC

David Bowie – Hunky Dory

T. Rex – Electric Warrior

John Lennon – Imagine

The Who – Who’s Next

The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers

FILM

A Clockwork Orange (dir. Stanley Kubrick)

THX-1138 (dir. George Lucas)

Straw Dogs (dir. Sam Peckinpah)

Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory (dir. Mel Stuart)

Dirty Harry (dir. Don Siegel)

COMICS

– Jack Kirby kicks off his main Fourth World saga with New Gods #1.

Swamp Thing debuts in #92 by Len Wein & Bernie Wrightson.

Blackmark by Gil Kane, an early graphic novel, is published.

Ra’s Al Ghul debuts in Batman #232 by Dennis O’Neil & Neal Adams.

Amazing Spider-Man #96-#98 by Stan Lee & Gil Kane published without Comics Code Authority Seal, due to storyline relating to drug use; an early victory against comics censorship after the witch hunts of the 1950s.

– Greg

Christmas Carolz III

Alright Sound of the Noising Machine readers, it’s that time of year again. Christmas Carolz time!!! Here’s my third installment of some holiday songs I like, some new, some old, some covers, some originals. And “Merry Christmas (Don’t Forget To Write)” by my band, Golden Veins! Here are the previous entries:

Christmas Carolz I

Christmas Carolz II

On with the show…

Golden Veins – “Merry Christmas (Don’t Forget To Write)”

Matt Goode – “Last Christmas”

T. Rex – “Christmas Bop”

Ride – “Like A Snowflake”


Weezer – “The Christmas Song”

Ryan Adams – “Hey Parker, It’s Christmas”

Cocteau Twins – “Winter Wonderland”

David Bowie & Bing Crosby – “Little Drummer Boy/Peace On Earth”

The Killers – “Don’t Shoot Me Santa”

Coldplay – “Christmas Lights”

The Walkmen – “Christmas Party”

Morning Musume – “Silent Night”


Please enjoy those, and enjoy these 12 Yuletide jointz below, one for each day of X-Mas. Merry Christmas, and I’ll see you back here this time next year for Christmas Carolz IV!!!

– Greg

30 YEARS AGO

MOVIES

THE SHINING (d. Stanley Kubrick)

THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK (d. Irvin Kershner)

KAGEMUSHA (d. Akira Kurosawa)


MAD MAX (d. George Miller)

RAGING BULL (d. Martin Scorsese)

ALBUMS

JOY DIVISION – CLOSER

THE CURE – SEVENTEEN SECONDS

DAVIE BOWIE – SCARY MONSTERS

U2 – BOY

JOHN LENNON & YOKO ONO – DOUBLE FANTASY

COMICS

RAW #1 is published


The Dark Phoenix Saga by Chris Claremont & John Byrne (Uncanny X-Men #129-138)

Domu by Katsuhiro Otomo begins its serialization in Young Magazine

Epic Illustrated begins

The New Teen Titans by Marv Wolfman & George Perez debuts

G.



40 YEARS AGO

MOVIES

PATTON (d. Franklin J. Schaffner)

M.A.S.H. (d. Robert Altman)

DODES’KA-DEN (d. Akira Kurosawa)

DOMICLE CONJUGAL aka BED AND BOARD (d. Francois Truffaut)

GIMME SHELTER (d. The Maysles Brothers)

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

ALBUMS

DAVID BOWIE – THE MAN WHO SOLD THE WORLD

THE BEATLES – LET IT BE

THE STOOGES – FUN HOUSE

JOHN LENNON – JOHN LENNON/PLASTIC ONO BAND


THE VELVET UNDERGROUND – LOADED

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

COMICS


Fantastic Four #102 – The end of Stan Lee & Jack Kirby’s 102 consecutive issue-run, a comics milestone.

Lone Wolf & Cub by Kazuo Koike & Goseki Kojima begins in the pages of Weekly Manga Action.

Barry Windsor Smith’s run on Conan The Barbarian begins.


Detective Comics #395 is published, featuring the first Batman collaboration of Dennis O’Neil & Neal Adams.

Jack Kirby leaves Marvel Comics.

G.

-AM- Greatest Hits

Well, my semester is over and I just finished moving into my new place so I have time again. Time to write about nothing. I discussed GREATEST HITS collections with Allison Paynez awhile ago and now I’d like to talk about it some more.

Allison’s position was that they’re basically useless and I probably would have shared that sentiment a year ago. TODAY, however, I definitely see their value for a variety of reasons.

1) Prior to the 1960s, the ALBUM as a fully-formed, cohesive body of work was NOT the norm. Most albums prior to the 1960s were simply greatest hits albums with some filler added in, especially in genres like rock ‘n’ roll and its close relative country. So if you’re listening to music that’s 50 years old or older, you’re pretty going to HAVE to rely on compilations.

This isn’t even really an issue of time, either. Most hip-hop and electronic recording artists of the 1970s and early 1980s ONLY recorded singles. Hip-hop pioneers the Cold Crush Brothers never released a proper album but they’re historically significant and their compilation-only status shouldn’t be held against them. Similarly, almost all of the GOOD early Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five recordings were singles-only.

2) Not all artists make great albums but some of them make a whole lot of great individual songs. Perhaps the strongest example of this, ACCORDING TO MY TASTES, is David Bowie. Between Greg Guts and Ben Baierz I’ve heard several David Bowie albums in their entirety and I have yet to hear one that I really embrace as a whole. In spite of that, there are always a few songs on each album that I really like. Bowie has been a very prolific recording artist in his career and songs that I like by him have really piled up. Given that, I would be glad to listen to a Greatest Hits album by him, even if I don’t typically want to listen to complete albums by him.

3) My final point is that gReatest hitZ albums provide a snapshot of a band or even an era. This is especially valid for those that consider themselves serious musicians or perhaps musical historians of sorts. For example, old country or jazz recordings. For an individual that is slightly interested in 1940s honky tonk recordings but not wild about them, a nice, tidy little Hank Williams (Sr.) compilation provides a snapshot of the era provided by one of the best performers of the style.

What actually got me thinking about this topic (again) wasn’t even music but actually some comics I came across as I was moving out of my apartment this week. Since I was 10, I’ve had some interest in Dick Tracy comics by Chester Gould. A few years ago I decided to buy some book collections of his strips but they were all basically ‘greatest hits’ collections so I bought them reluctantly. A couple of years ago, IDW started printing ALL of the Tracy strips in sequence and I couldn’t realy hold interest. The Tracy greatest hits books reminded me that I might as well concentrate on the best stuff an artist creates rather than discount him or her or them because some of the lesser work is not as interesting. The End.

These are some writings on the same topic from DK Presents blog:

dkpresents.wordpress.com

I don’t necessarily agree with his lists but they’re well-reasoned.

kicknz