Tag Archives: 70 aspects of batman

70 Aspects Of Batman: 24

JORDI BERNET

From Wikipedia:

Jordi Bernet Cussó (born June 14, 1944, Barcelona) is a Catalan comics artist, best known for the gangster comics series Torpedo.

The son of a famous Spanish comic book artist, Miguel (Miguel or Miquel Bernet), he made his debut in comics at fifteen, continuing his father’s humorous series Doña Urraca (Mrs. Magpie) after his death in 1960, under the pseudonym “Jordi”.

Turning to the German market, in the 1970s he collaborated with Cussó to create Wat 69, a sexy and humouristic heroine for the magazine Pip, and Andrax, a science fiction series for Primo, which both became successful in Germany.

After the fall of Franco, Bernet returned to Catalonia and Spain and worked for several Spanish comics magazines such as Creepy, Metropol and Cimoc, eventually meeting three writers with whom he would form productive partnerships. With Antonio Segura he created the amazone fantasy series Sarvan, and the series Kraken, depicting a sewer monster terrorizing a futuristic fascist society.

Bernet first collaborated with Enrique Sánchez Abulí on several short stories, collected in Historietas negras. When Alex Toth, after producing two stories of Torpedo 1936 in 1981, decided he did not share Abulí’s darkly humorous view of mankind and parted with the project, Bernet was asked to continue the work.[4] This became the beginning of a long-lasting series, which became a popular success and was awarded at the Angoulême International Comics Festival. It eventually formed the basis of its own magazine, Luca Torelli es Torpedo in 1992.[3] Later collaborations with Abulí include De vuelta a casa, La naturaleza de la bestia: Ab Irato and Snake: por un puñado de dolares.

Bernet’s more recent publications include several albums for the Italian western character Tex Willer, and a run of work for the U.S. comics market, including a Batman story, and a trilogy detailing “the shocking origin” of Jonah Hex.[5] Bernet has later continued to work with Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray on Jonah Hex.

Will Eisner described his impression of Bernet’s work in an anthology preface:[6]

Here was a man who was producing pure story-telling art. That is art that uses the kind of minimalism so singular to his draftsmanship that is actually a narrative device in itself. This fit into my own philosophy of sequential narrative art. I pursued the progress of his work with great interest.
—Will Eisner


I’m a little ashamed to admit my overall ignorance of Mr. Bernet’s work…really, my only exposure to it thus far has been in the pages of Solo #6, which contains the Batman story this renowned artist illustrated. As mentioned by Will Eisner, Bernet’s storytelling skills are superlative and his cartoony-realistic style even reminds me of the amazing Eisner. I’d love to know more about the world of European comics, so maybe the work of Jordi Bernet is a a good place to start. Also, I recommend trying to track down Solo #6….I  can attest that it’s a great introduction to the man’s work.


G.

70 Aspects Of Batman: 23

RAFAEL GRAMPA

From Wikipedia:

Rafael Grampá is a Brazilian comic book artist and writer. The comics anthology 5 created by Grampá along with Gabriel Bá, Becky Cloonan, Fábio Moon and Vasilis Lolos won the 2008 Eisner Award for Best Anthology. He is author and artist of the Mesmo Delivery comic.[1]

I don’t have much to say about Rafael Grampa, because I don’t know much about him! I do know he’s from Brazil, and that he’s awesome. He hasn’t done much American comic work, as far as I know…he did a short story in Hellblazer a little while ago, and his creator-owned Mesmo Delivery is amazing. I love his Frank Quitely meets Geoff Darrow style. I have no idea where the above picture is from, but it makes me wish some editor at DC would assign Grampa a Bat-project pronto.

G.

70 Aspects Of Batman: 22

KATSUHIRO OTOMO

From Wikipedia:

Katsuhiro Otomo (大友克洋, Ōtomo Katsuhiro?, born April 14, 1954) is a Japanese manga artist, film director, and screenwriter. He is perhaps best known for being the creator of the manga Akira and its anime adaptation, which are extremely famous and influential. Otomo has also directed several live-action films, such as the 2006 feature film adaptation of the Mushishi manga.

Otomo’s Batman has only appeared once, in an 8-page story featured in Batman: Black & White from 1996. The story features Otomo trademarks like psychic battle and crazed psychos…I can’t admit I actually completely understand it, but it’s interesting and looks like great and is, thus far, his only foray into American comics. The image above is the only one I could find online, but it gives you an idea. Even though his Batwork is limited to one picture here, I wanted to include Otomo because of his impact on world comic culture, and my own love of his work. It would be lovely to have another Batstory from this influential artist (or another comic story in general), but I’m not holding my breath. I guess we’ll just have to be happy with what we have.

G.

70 Aspects Of Batman:21

JOCK


From Wikipedia:

Mark Simpson, known by the pen name Jock, is a British comics artist, best known for his work in 2000 AD and on The Losers.[1]

Jock began his professional career at 2000 AD, on series including Judge Dredd and Lenny Zero[2]. He has worked in the American comic book market at DC Comics and their Vertigo imprint.

Like most American comic enthusiasts, I first saw the work of Jock in the pages of Vertigo’s Losers comic, which was recently adapted into a feature film. Since then, he’s become one of the industry’s go-to guys for memorable cover art…most of the images in this post come from a stint he did as the cover artist for Batman. Recently he added some interior Bat-work to his resume with a Detective Comics arc written by Greg Rucka.

His work has also appeared in other media, including the package art for the Criterion Collection’s release of Akira Kurosawa’s Drunken Angel.

G.

70 Aspects Of Batman: 20

YOSHITAKA AMANO

Taken from Wikipedia:

Yoshitaka Amano (天野 喜孝 (formerly 天野 嘉孝), Amano Yoshitaka?) (born July 28, 1952) is a Japanese artist known for his illustrations for Vampire Hunter D and for his character designs, image illustrations and title logo designs for the Final Fantasy series.[1] In early 2010, he established Studio Deva Loka, a film production company.

Amano’s great…I’m lucky enough to have a signed print of his artwork from the Sandman:Dream Hunters book (though it’s signed by Neil Gaiman, not him). Unfortunately, I think this is his only Batman work, done as a poster for DC. It’s too bad, because an illustrated novel featuring his Batman would be amazing. He also did a Superman piece, but I’m saving that for the 80 Aspects of Superman series I’m starting in 2018.

G.

70 Aspects Of Batman: 19


BILL SIENKIEWICZ

From Wikipedia:

Boleslav Felix Robert “Bill” Sienkiewicz [pronounced sin-KEV-itch][2] (born May 3, 1958,[1][3]) is an Eisner Award-winning American artist best known for his comic book work, primarily for Marvel ComicsThe New Mutants and Elektra: Assassin. Sienkiewicz often utilizes oil painting, collage, mimeograph and other forms generally uncommon in comic books. Sienkiewicz broke into the comics business at age 19[5] with an art style heavily influenced by Neal Adams’ work.

In addition to his work in comics, Sienkiewicz has also worked in numerous other media. In 1995, he illustrated the Martin I. Green biography of Jimi Hendrix, Voodoo Child: The Illustrated Legend of Jimi Hendrix. The following year he provided the artwork for the Bruce Cockburn album The Charity of Night, and went on to provide album covers for RZA‘s Bobby Digital in Stereo (1998) and EPMD‘s Business as Usual (1990).

Sienkiewicz hasn’t done a huge amount of Batman work, unfortunately. He did contribute some interior pages to Batman #400, an anniversary issue that featured various artists:

He also wrote and drew a story for the original Batman:Black & White miniseries. In the last decade or so, Bill has drawn various covers for the Dark Knight (most recently for the Batman: Widening Gyre miniseries written by Kevin Smith), and has inked random issues here or there.

He also painted the below cover for a movie adaptation that didn’t deserve his talent:

And drew some sketches based on a movie that was worth his talents:

Bill Sienkiewicz: one of the most original, influential artists that comics has ever known.

G.

70 Aspects Of Batman: 18

BatmanLegendsOfDarkKnightCv

SETH FISHER

BatmanLegendsOfDarkKnightCv_2

From Wikipedia:

Seth Fisher (July 22, 1972January 30, 2006) was an American comic book artist and penciller.

Fisher possessed a unique and instantly recognizable drawing style. He first gained attention for his work on DC ComicsGreen Lantern: Willworld, and was nominated for an Eisner Award for “Best Penciller/Inker” for Flash: Time Flies and Vertigo Pop! Tokyo.

Batmanfisher

In 2005, Fisher pencilled the five issue “Snow” story arc of the Batman series Legends of the Dark Knight, written by Dan Curtis Johnson and J.H. Williams III. Fisher provided the art for the Marvel mini-series Fantastic Four/Iron Man: Big in Japan (scripted by Zeb Wells) that appeared in 2005. (The series’ final issue was published in early 2006.)

Fisher produced magazine and album covers in Finland and his adopted home of Japan. He also worked for a time for Presto Studios doing concept design work for the computer game Myst III: Exile.

LegendsOfDarkKnightCv196

Fisher produced magazine and album covers in Finland and his adopted home of Japan. He also worked for a time for Presto Studios doing concept design work for the computer game Myst III: Exile.

He died as a result of injuries suffered in a fall from a seventh story roof off an Osaka, Japan club.

batsnow-717119

I became a fan of Seth Fisher’s work on Vertigo Pop! Tokyo, and was excited when heard he would be tackling Batman. His artwork had some kind of manga sensibility, but it didn’t just imitate the traits normally associated with that style. The “Snow” story-arc showed that Fisher’s cartoony pencilling and the noir-infused world of Batman need not be mutually exclusive.  Sadly, it would prove to be his sole Gotham City foray; his tragic and untimely death cut down an artist that was only just coming into his prime and who, I’m convinced, would have become one of the great comic artists of the decade. Still, at least we still have the work he did complete; for that, at least, we can be thankful.

G.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to FurlAdd to Newsvine

70 Aspects Of Batman: 17

blotdk151

JOHN CASSADAY

blotdk150

From Wikipedia:

John Cassaday (born 1971) is an American comic book artist and writer, born in Fort Worth, Texas and currently residing in New York City. He is known for having a high level of precision and realism in his work.

A self-taught illustrator, Cassaday studied filmmaking and directed TV news before leaving Texas to pursue a career in comics. His influences include NC Wyeth, classic pulp magazine-culture iconography, and popular music.

He is best known for his work on the critically acclaimed Planetary with writer Warren Ellis, Astonishing X-Men with Joss Whedon and Captain America with John Ney Rieber.

From 2004 to 2008, Cassaday illustrated the graphic novel trilogy Je suis légion by Fabien Nury from Les Humanoïdes Associés.

BLDK152


I like John Cassaday’s stuff, though I’ve really only read his Planetary work. He strikes me as being a really solid superhero artist like Alan Davis, who he reminds me of. These pictures are all from covers Cassaday did for Legends Of The Dark Knight.

blotdk149

G.

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Furl | Newsvine

70 Aspects Of Batman: 16

legends169

TONY HARRIS

Batman_Legends_of_the_Dark_Knight_122

BATMAN_LEGENDS_OF_THE_DARK_KNIGHT_170

From Wikipedia:

Tony Harris (born 1969) is an American comic book artist. He is most famous for Starman, winner of the 1997 Eisner for best serialized story, Iron Man, and currently Ex Machina, winner of the 2005 Eisner for best new series.

171-1

Harris debuted in the comics in 1989 and rose to prominence in 1994 with the publication of DC comics’ Starman. Co-created with James Robinson, Starman led the two to critical acclaim and eventually a Will Eisner comic industry award for the Sand and Stars story arc.
BATMAN_SHADOW_OF_THE_BAT_90

Current projects include Ex Machina with Brian K. Vaughan, published by Wildstorm Comics and War Heroes with Mark Millar, published by Image Comics.

tharris1

As I mentioned in the earlier 70 AOB post about Mike Mignola, Starman is one of my favorite comic series. Tony Harris’ artwork is a big part of why I love it. His earlier style was dark and angular…it makes sense that he began his career in horror comics. This style instantly set Starman apart from the rest of the superhero comics published at DC in the mid-90s. Harris co-created the world of Starman Jack Knight with writer James Robinson, and was the regular artist on the book until #45. Toward the end of his run, he had the chance to depict Batman in his distinctive manner, as can be seen above in this painted cover.

tonyharris_sdas22

But to date, Harris’ most notable work on the Dark Knight can be found in JSA: The Liberty Files, an Elseworlds story that plunges Batman, Superman and various JSA characters into a World War II espionage scenario. This series, from the early 2000s, showcases Tony Harris’ evolved style, where the formerly jutting angles have become curved.

jsa-libertyfiles-tpb

It’s a good read, I suggest tracking it down if you can.

jsa-unholy3-group

G.

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Furl | Newsvine

70 Aspects Of Batman: 15

eddie_campbell_BatmanTheOrderofBeasts24

EDDIE CAMPBELL

Eddie Campbell (born 10 August 1955) is a Scottish comics artist and cartoonist who now lives in Australia. Probably best known as the illustrator and publisher of From Hell (written by Alan Moore), Campbell is also the creator of the semi-autobiographical Alec stories, and Bacchus (aka Deadface), a wry adventure series about the few Greek gods who have survived to the present day. His graphic novel The Fate of the Artist, which playfully investigates Campbell’s own sudden disappearance, was published in May 2006 by First Second Books. His latest graphic novel, The Black Diamond Detective Agency, was published in June 2007, also by First Second Books.

His scratchy pen-and-ink style is influenced by the impressionists, illustrators of the age of “liberated penmanship” such as Phil May, Charles Dana Gibson, John Leech and George du Maurier, and cartoonists Milton Caniff and Frank Frazetta (particularly his Johnny Comet strip). His writing has been compared to Jack Kerouac and Henry Miller.


Batman-Order-of-Beasts-Eddie-Campbell

Campbell’s most substantial Batman-related work can be found within the covers of the above one-shot, released in 2003. Batman: Order Of The Beasts is an Elseworlds story that features a 1930s Dark Knight in an England on the brink of war. The Batman becomes embroiled in a conflict with the titular order, and hijinks ensue. Campbell isn’t exactly known for his superhero work, so it’s a rare treat to see his take on a costumed adventurer. Beasts flew under the radar on its release in 2003, but it’s a great little book and well worth seeking out.

bats

G.