Tag Archives: 70 aspects of batman

70 Aspects Of Batman: 27

STEVE DITKO

From Wikipedia:

Stephen J. “Steve” Ditko (born November 2, 1927) is an American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of the Marvel Comics heroes Spider-Man & Doctor Strange. Considered a legend by many for his co-creation of some of Marvel’s most iconic characters, Ditko’s post-1960s comics work has had little impact, and by the end of the 1990s he had retired from mainstream publishing. For most of the last few decades, Ditko has maintained a secretive profile, only occasionally self-publishing his Objectivist-inspired comics.

What more can I say about Ditko that I didn’t already here? Well, he drew Batman once, that’s what. As far as I can tell, the only time my favorite Objectivist artist ever drew the Dark Knight Detective was, bizarrely, in the pages of Man-Bat #1, from 1975. An extremely short-lived series (this was the first of only two issues before it was canceled), Man-Bat featured the exploits of Kirk Langstrom, a scientist whose experiments in things led him to become the incredibly-literal titular creature.

The 70s saw Ditko largely acting as a journeyman penciller, drawing varied books for varied publishers while working on his more personal Ayn Rand-inspired work. Hence his work on Man-Bat. Even on work-for-hire like this, Ditko’s quirky style shines through. I love how almost every one of his Batman renderings hides his face in complete shadow apart from his eyes. I don’t think I’ve seen another artist do that before.

Like Jack Kirby, Ditko did a lot of work for DC after leaving Marvel, creating or co-creating characters like The Creeper, Hawk & Dove and Shade, The Changing Man along the way. Also like Kirby, he rarely worked on DC’s most famous icons. So it’s a treat to see his take on Batman, even if it’s just in the form of a few pages in an obscure spin-off

- Greg

70 Aspects Of Batman: 26

MOEBIUS

From Wikipedia:

Jean Henri Gaston Giraud (born May 8, 1938[1]) is a French comics artist. Giraud has earned worldwide fame, not only under his own name but also under the pseudonym Moebius, and to a lesser extent Gir, the latter appearing mostly in the form of a boxed signature at the bottom of the artist’s paintings.

Jean Giraud was born in Nogent-sur-Marne, in the suburbs of Paris, in 1938.[2][3] At 18, he was drawing his own comic strip, “Frank et Jeremie” for the magazine Far West. In 1961, Giraud became an apprentice of Jijé, one of the leading comic artists in Europe of the time, and collaborated on an album of Jerry Spring.[3] In 1962 Giraud and writer Jean-Michel Charlier started the comic strip Fort Navajo for Pilote. It was a great hit and continued uninterrupted until 1974. The Lieutenant Blueberry character, created by Giraud and Charlier for Fort Navajo, quickly became its most popular character, and his adventures as told in the spin-off Blueberry, are possibly Giraud’s best known work in his native France. Giraud’s prestige in France – where comics are held in high artistic regard – is enormous; In 1988 Moebius was chosen, among 11 other winners of the prestigious Grand Prix of the Angoulême Festival, to illustrate a postage stamp set issued on the theme of communication. Under the names Giraud and Gir, he also wrote numerous comics for other comic artists like Auclair and Tardi.

The Moebius pseudonym, which Giraud came to use for his science fiction and fantasy work, was born in 1963. In a satire magazine called Hara-Kiri, Moebius did 21 strips in 1963–64 and then disappeared for almost a decade. In 1975 Métal Hurlant (a magazine which he co-created) brought it back and in 1981 he started his famous L’Incal series in collaboration with Alejandro Jodorowsky. Moebius’ famous serial The Airtight Garage and his groundbreaking Arzach also began in Métal Hurlant.

Moebius has contributed storyboards and concept designs to numerous science fiction films. In 1982 he collaborated with director René Laloux to create the science fiction feature-length animated movie Les Maîtres du temps (released in English as Time Masters) based on a novel by Stefan Wul. In 1988 Moebius worked on the American comic character The Silver Surfer with Stan Lee for a special two-part limited series. Giraud is also known to be a friend of filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki. From December 2004 to March 2005, the two of them shared an exhibition at La Monnaie in Paris.

I don’t have much to say about Moebius as I haven’t read much of the stuff he’s worked on at all, shamefully. As I mentioned in one of the previous 70 AOB posts, my knowledge of European comics is sadly lacking when compared to what I know about the American or even Japanese variety. His linework is great, and his painted work is absolutely stunning. His Batman work (and his work in American comics in general) is quite limited, consisting of the pin-up at the top of the post and an 8-page story, examples of which can be seen above and below this paragraph. I can’t remember the circumstances, but this short story was intended for publication by DC as a bona fide Batman story until someone in the upper echelons nixed it, presumably due to its less than badass depiction of the Caped Crusader. The story was ultimately published by the Heavy Metal-inspired Penthouse Comix (which was related the smut magazine of the same name) in 1995 under the title “This Is Not A Batman Story”.

Thanks to Scott for the assist.

G.

70 Aspects Of Batman: 25

CAMERON STEWART

From Wikipedia:

Cameron Stewart is an Eisner Award and Eagle Award -nominated and Shuster Award-winning Canadian comic book artist, who has worked for DC, Marvel, and Dark Horse Comics.

Stewart is best known for his work on Catwoman with writer Ed Brubaker, and Seaguy and Seven Soldiers: The Manhattan Guardian with writer Grant Morrison.

October 2006 saw the release of The Other Side, a miniseries about the Vietnam war illustrated by Stewart (and written by Jason Aaron), for which he travelled to Vietnam for research. The Other Side was nominated for an Eisner Award in the Best Limited Series category of 2007.

Along with Frank Quitely and Frazier Irving, Cameron Stewart has been one of Grant Morrison’s greatest collaborative foils over the last five years. In addition to their work together on  Seaguy and Manhattan Guardian, Stewart also recently drew an arc in Morrison’s Batman And Robin title. Stewart’s clean but kinetic style fit the three-part story like a glove, which detailed Dick Grayson’s efforts to resurrect Bruce Wayne with the help of Batwoman and The Knight & Squire, England’s answer to the Dynamic Duo.

Stewart also designed the Cowboy Batman that appeared in Batman: The Return of Bruce Wayne #4 and was set to illustrate the issue but was replaced, possibly due to the recent announcement that he will be the artist drawing Grant’s final Batman And Robin storyline.

I think Cameron’s a great artist…I highly recommend checking out his blog for more Batman-related stuff and other examples of his work. He’s also the artist and co-writer on the upcoming Assassin’s Creed comic which is coming out soon and may be of interest to some of the readers of this site (Matt).

G.

p.s. Sorry for the long gap between 70 AOB posts. I hope to get them going on a more regular basis. Thanks to everyone who stops by to read them. Meeting someone who actually reads them in person is what inspired me to get back on the horse. Thanks, Ronny!

p.s.s. Did I spell your name right?

70 Aspects Of Batman: 24

JORDI BERNET

From Wikipedia:

Jordi Bernet Cussó (born June 14, 1944, Barcelona) is a Catalan comics artist, best known for the gangster comics series Torpedo.

The son of a famous Spanish comic book artist, Miguel (Miguel or Miquel Bernet), he made his debut in comics at fifteen, continuing his father’s humorous series Doña Urraca (Mrs. Magpie) after his death in 1960, under the pseudonym “Jordi”.

Turning to the German market, in the 1970s he collaborated with Cussó to create Wat 69, a sexy and humouristic heroine for the magazine Pip, and Andrax, a science fiction series for Primo, which both became successful in Germany.

After the fall of Franco, Bernet returned to Catalonia and Spain and worked for several Spanish comics magazines such as Creepy, Metropol and Cimoc, eventually meeting three writers with whom he would form productive partnerships. With Antonio Segura he created the amazone fantasy series Sarvan, and the series Kraken, depicting a sewer monster terrorizing a futuristic fascist society.

Bernet first collaborated with Enrique Sánchez Abulí on several short stories, collected in Historietas negras. When Alex Toth, after producing two stories of Torpedo 1936 in 1981, decided he did not share Abulí’s darkly humorous view of mankind and parted with the project, Bernet was asked to continue the work.[4] This became the beginning of a long-lasting series, which became a popular success and was awarded at the Angoulême International Comics Festival. It eventually formed the basis of its own magazine, Luca Torelli es Torpedo in 1992.[3] Later collaborations with Abulí include De vuelta a casa, La naturaleza de la bestia: Ab Irato and Snake: por un puñado de dolares.

Bernet’s more recent publications include several albums for the Italian western character Tex Willer, and a run of work for the U.S. comics market, including a Batman story, and a trilogy detailing “the shocking origin” of Jonah Hex.[5] Bernet has later continued to work with Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray on Jonah Hex.

Will Eisner described his impression of Bernet’s work in an anthology preface:[6]

Here was a man who was producing pure story-telling art. That is art that uses the kind of minimalism so singular to his draftsmanship that is actually a narrative device in itself. This fit into my own philosophy of sequential narrative art. I pursued the progress of his work with great interest.
—Will Eisner


I’m a little ashamed to admit my overall ignorance of Mr. Bernet’s work…really, my only exposure to it thus far has been in the pages of Solo #6, which contains the Batman story this renowned artist illustrated. As mentioned by Will Eisner, Bernet’s storytelling skills are superlative and his cartoony-realistic style even reminds me of the amazing Eisner. I’d love to know more about the world of European comics, so maybe the work of Jordi Bernet is a a good place to start. Also, I recommend trying to track down Solo #6….I  can attest that it’s a great introduction to the man’s work.


G.

70 Aspects Of Batman: 23

RAFAEL GRAMPA

From Wikipedia:

Rafael Grampá is a Brazilian comic book artist and writer. The comics anthology 5 created by Grampá along with Gabriel Bá, Becky Cloonan, Fábio Moon and Vasilis Lolos won the 2008 Eisner Award for Best Anthology. He is author and artist of the Mesmo Delivery comic.[1]

I don’t have much to say about Rafael Grampa, because I don’t know much about him! I do know he’s from Brazil, and that he’s awesome. He hasn’t done much American comic work, as far as I know…he did a short story in Hellblazer a little while ago, and his creator-owned Mesmo Delivery is amazing. I love his Frank Quitely meets Geoff Darrow style. I have no idea where the above picture is from, but it makes me wish some editor at DC would assign Grampa a Bat-project pronto.

G.

70 Aspects Of Batman: 22

KATSUHIRO OTOMO

From Wikipedia:

Katsuhiro Otomo (大友克洋, Ōtomo Katsuhiro?, born April 14, 1954) is a Japanese manga artist, film director, and screenwriter. He is perhaps best known for being the creator of the manga Akira and its anime adaptation, which are extremely famous and influential. Otomo has also directed several live-action films, such as the 2006 feature film adaptation of the Mushishi manga.

Otomo’s Batman has only appeared once, in an 8-page story featured in Batman: Black & White from 1996. The story features Otomo trademarks like psychic battle and crazed psychos…I can’t admit I actually completely understand it, but it’s interesting and looks like great and is, thus far, his only foray into American comics. The image above is the only one I could find online, but it gives you an idea. Even though his Batwork is limited to one picture here, I wanted to include Otomo because of his impact on world comic culture, and my own love of his work. It would be lovely to have another Batstory from this influential artist (or another comic story in general), but I’m not holding my breath. I guess we’ll just have to be happy with what we have.

G.

70 Aspects Of Batman:21

JOCK


From Wikipedia:

Mark Simpson, known by the pen name Jock, is a British comics artist, best known for his work in 2000 AD and on The Losers.[1]

Jock began his professional career at 2000 AD, on series including Judge Dredd and Lenny Zero[2]. He has worked in the American comic book market at DC Comics and their Vertigo imprint.

Like most American comic enthusiasts, I first saw the work of Jock in the pages of Vertigo’s Losers comic, which was recently adapted into a feature film. Since then, he’s become one of the industry’s go-to guys for memorable cover art…most of the images in this post come from a stint he did as the cover artist for Batman. Recently he added some interior Bat-work to his resume with a Detective Comics arc written by Greg Rucka.

His work has also appeared in other media, including the package art for the Criterion Collection’s release of Akira Kurosawa’s Drunken Angel.

G.